Enniskillen Crannog

What a heritage hero!

> “Today I spent a few hours at the crannog in Enniskillen and it is a wonderful site, full of our history and precious archaeology”

> “That is why I instructed that a no-go zone be created around the site, with a ban on any construction traffic passing near or close to the crannog to protect the asset.”

> “As one of the very few to be excavated, I wish to deploy appropriate resources to fully excavate and record this gem of archaeology.”

> “If the crannog cannot now be saved, I will work to have a maximum excavation and record strategy going forward.”

> “I will appoint an independent person or persons to review the full story of this site, including how the current situation developed.”

> “Indeed, with major road developments in the pipeline, how known and unknown heritage sites are protected is an issue that I will be robustly interrogating.”

UPDATE: We have been asked to provide background information on this. We can do no better than provide a link to the blog of archaeologist Robert Chapple. The contrast between the Minister’s positivity and Mr Chapple’s account – including of the unacceptable time limits placed upon the excavation – is very striking. He even writes:

“It is also with great sadness that I learned today that the site crew had been interrogated in an attempt to discover who had the temerity to speak to me for this blog. One brave individual spoke up and admitted that they had provided the excellent photographs that I posted in yesterday’s update. By this evening they had been dismissed from their position without notice.”

Perhaps the Minister could extend his own enthusiasm for robust investigation to include this matter, as a matter of urgency?