But not in the way either of them expected?

naz

Greenpeace activists have been criticised for setting up an enormous climate change banner next to the Nazca Lines in Peru and allegedly causing damage. They strongly deny any harm, saying “We can assure you that absolutely NO damage was done. The message was written in cloth letters that laid on the ground without touching the Nazca lines”…. which may or may not be true (not, actually, since apparently their footsteps will stay for centuries and Peru intends to sue them!) but it sounds very, very familiar to British ears and particularly to those who have followed the endless succession of officially authorised stunts at the Uffington White Horse and other monuments over the years.

Even more familiar to British ears was this additional assurance: “It was assessed by an experienced archaeologist, ensuring not even a trace was left behind.” People might wonder what sort of “experienced archaeologist” would have got involved in the stunt, just as many of us keep asking why The National Trust and other guardians allow this sort of “good cause” brandalism to happen at places in their care. The bottom line is the more it is done the more there’s a risk of damaging copycatting.

Will this latest incident finally convince the National Trust to announce it is going to desist from allowing it? (Might it cross their minds that Greenpeace could have got the idea from the Trust’s “good cause brandalism factory” at Uffington?)