.

When at Stonehenge always use our Conservationometer.

When at Stonehenge always use our Conservationometer.

This week there have been two examples of why it’s important.

First, following the revelation that asbestos was dumped at Stonehenge, the Open Access to Stonehenge group has polled its members about whether the organisation should be “part of an official investigation into pollution of the WHS”. Hmmm. Every summer solstice Stonehenge is “polluted” with litter and sometimes far worse. It wouldn’t happen if OATS members and others weren’t resistant to calls for restricting numbers inside the stones so that adequate control can be achieved. Until they do so it seems a tad pretentious to be wanting to be part of an investigation into other forms of pollution.

Second, while the Stonehenge Alliance got their own message across in the press, (“anything shorter than a 2.7-mile (4.3 km) tunnel would cause “irreparable damage to the landscape”) somehow English Heritage and The Natonal Trust were portrayed as standing shoulder-to-shoulder with them: (“English Heritage and the National Trust have also given their support to the option of “the longest tunnel possible”).” Er, not exactly. Those two bodies may well have said that, which suggests they too are supporting a 2.7 mile tunnel, but the dreadful reality is that they have both indicated they are also prepared to support a shorter, damaging tunnel!