We get accused of being anti-wind farms – indeed, anti development. We aren’t. That would be unrealistic. The country can’t be kept as a museum. In fact, all we’re opposed to is occasional developments which blight ancient heritage sites to an exceptional degree. Our conviction is that there are a few sites which are just too precious to be harmed at all by the twenty first century and that the planning system doesn’t have the concept of “sacrosanct” written into it, and should. The surroundings of Oswestry Hill Fort and the World Heritage landscape at Stonehenge are two prime candidates for “sacrosanct status”. Here are another two (not directly involving ancient sites but illustrating the point very well) …..

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There's a proposal to build a wind farm at Navitus Bay on the south coast of England. A quotation from The National Trust will suffice:

There’s a proposal to build a wind farm at Navitus Bay on the south coast of England. A quotation from The National Trust will suffice: “Our objection was because of the impact on the beautiful coastlines of East Dorset and the Isle of Wight, including well-loved sites such as the Needles on the Isle of Wight, and Old Harry Rocks on Purbeck.” Those places, surely, should be sacrosanct?

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Bass Rock, a tiny island in the Firth of Forth containing the world's largest gannet colony. A windfarm is proposed nearby. Academics estimate that 1,500 gannets a year will be killed by the turbines.

Bass Rock, a tiny island in the Firth of Forth containing the world’s largest gannet colony. A windfarm is proposed nearby. Academics estimate that 1,500 gannets a year will be killed by the turbines.