by Alan S.

It seems to have come round far too quickly, but once again it’s time for our traditional Review of the Heritage Journal Year.

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This year seems to have been dominated by just a few main stories: the battle to save Old Oswestry Hillfort, the ongoing saga of the Stonehenge Tunnel and our continuing campaign against non-recording metal detectorists. But aside from these main stories, each of which featured in just about every month throughout the year, there was also plenty more to report upon and bring to your attention.

January
We began the year with our customary Resolutions, but sadly reading back it seems that once again, none were met. We pointed out that when it comes to some sites, interpretations come and go, and when it comes to hoards being discovered we suggested ways in which it wouldn’t be necessary to immediately ‘hoik’ them out.

We’re supporters of RESCUE, the British Archaeological Trust and loved the tricky questions they asked the political parties about Stonehenge.

Our look at Stone Rows continued by featuring Burford Down and Brent Fore Hill, and we continued to point out the scheduling administrative inconsistencies at Mynydd y Betws, a story which is still ongoing.

February
Oswestry launched their ‘Hug a Hillfort‘ campaign, which was very successful, resulting in the ramparts being encircled by campaigners all holding hands on St Valentines Day.

Ringmoor Down  and Drizzlecombe stone rows were investigated, and we managed to obtain a couple of updates from English Heritage about the repairs to the Priddy Circles.

In an unusual move for us, we praised a statement from the National Trust. But unfortunately, information also came to light about damage to Stonehenge at the previous winter Solstice celebrations.

March
Continuing the theme of damage to Stonehenge, King Arthur Pendragon had a word to say about our views, but we also had a comment from someone in the emergency services about the mess and damage caused at the Solstice gatherings.

We looked at more stone rows at Drizzlecombe and documented another trip to Cornwall’s ancient monuments, including Tregonning Hill, Tregeseal, Chun and Boskednan Downs, and the Three Brothers of Grugwith on the Lizard.

April
Our Cornwall holiday concluded with trips to Carwynnen Quoit, St Columb and Minions.  Speaking of St Columb, plans to build a wind farm by the Nine Maidens stone row were mooted – and recommended by Historic England! Luckily, the plans have so far been rejected.

Our occasional series posing questions to heritage professionals, “Inside the Mind of…” gained two new participants this month, in David Breeze and David Jacques.

We were very pleased to be able to serialise a paper courtesy of Dr Euan MacKie regarding the Sheep Hill hillfort and associated rock carvings, which are currently under a long-running threat of destruction.

Leedon Tor was our featured stone row this month.

We continue our look back tomorrow in the second part of our 2015 review!