In response to the Heritage Journal’s plea to the world’s media to monitor Highways England’s invasive work in the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, David Bullock, Highways England’s project manager for the A303 Stonehenge scheme said:

The suggestion that survey work will destroy layers of archaeology is alarmist and untrue.

Perhaps the public can judge if this is the case.

The attached images are of one of the dozens of trenches Highways England excavated in the field where Mr Bullock was interviewed by Paul Clifton of BBC South yesterday, it cut straight through Bronze Age archaeology already known to be there. Why then destroy it? Oh, we forgot, according to Highways England they were looking to see if anything was there and if it was then it isn’t destroyed – David Bullock can perhaps explain how the layers of archaeology and context destroyed by this trench simply reassembles itself when backfilled?

The worrying actuality of this typically brutal assault in the Stonehenge landscape is that more archaeology has been destroyed by ruthless evaluation schemes connected with visitor centre sites and proposed road routes in the World Heritage Site than anyone wants to publicly admit. The vast majority of this destruction, as in the present case, is carried out in the name of a perceived threat as opposed to a scheme that was actually known to be going ahead. Depressingly, the methods used in these cases have not been to the same standards to which academic research is carried out. As for what happens to the archaeology that isn’t dumped back in the trench as spoil – even the archaeological evidence painstakingly collected by Julian Richards during the Stonehenge Environs Project was dumped without even asking him or the landowner if they wanted it back.

“Alarmist and untrue”? We think not!

See:

BBC News

New Civil Engineer