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So where (and when) was this remarkable image captured?

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september-puzzle

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APRIL PUZZLE.

The Red Lion at Avebury is famous for being the world’s only pub standing inside a stone circle but there’s another pub with an even better boast – it has a group of megaliths standing in its garden (see above). They’ve been scheduled for 135 years, as long as Stonehenge and Avebury and they’ve been standing there a thousand years longer.

What they were used for is a mystery but Historic England’s List Entry Summary helpfully suggests they may have had a “ritual purpose”. More convincingly, it’s said that a nearby village was the site of Camelot and that a sword was seen in a stone near to there. So …..  name those stones – and more to the point, name that pub!

March puzzle

It’s a scheduled Bronze Age stone circle and much visited. It is where Arthur extracted Excalibur. Perhaps.

Aubrey Burl said of it: “aerial photographs have revealed mediaeval ridge-and-furrow plough-marks not only running up to the ring, but also through it as though this ‘prehistoric’ megalithic ring might postdate the Middle Ages! It does not.” However, others have suggested he may have been wrong and that it is a fake.

So where is it? The answer, and the evidence, in a week.

Two images of hundreds of protestors at a hillfort. Can you spot the crucial difference?

Feb Puzzle

Well, the top one is the surroundings of Cissbury Rings, West Sussex and the lower one is Oswestry, Shropshire. But the difference is more than that. At the top one the Council promptly listened to the democratic voice and abandoned its sell-off plans. At the bottom one Shropshire Council not only ignored the democratic voice but also the combined voices of a host of national and international experts.

For reasons it still hasn’t explained it insists that a County with less than half a million people and 860,000 acres to choose from MUST build houses on one particular tiny spot where it will do maximum damage.

Back in November we highlighted another instance of heritage being safer in West Sussex than Shropshire) which prompted Oswestry Hillfort campaigner Dr George Nash to write: “I have just asked the Chairman of West Sussex Council if Old Oswestry Hillfort and its surrounding landscape can be incorporated into West Sussex. We want this ancient site to be administered by a useful, honest and progressive cultural heritage team”.  The above two pictures illustrate why that would be a damn good thing.

How did you get on with last week’s puzzle? A wider view may help …..

january puzzle answer.

January puzzle answer 2.

It’s British Camp, Malvern, as seen from The Kremlin Inn, Clee Hill, 30 miles away.

Suggestions for future puzzles very welcome.

Back in September the Environment Agency released a massive amount of open source LIDAR data for England and Wales. It is a bit patchy but we found LIDAR for ten well known (and not so well known) prehistoric sites. Your task over the Christmas break was simply to identify each of the sites.

So how did you do?

1.  Arminghall Henge, Norwich, Norfolk. 1

2. Maiden Castle, Dorchester, Dorset.2

3. Avebury, Wiltshire3

4. Merry Maidens, Boleigh, Cornwall4

5. Staden Enclosure, Buxton, Derbyshire5

6. Stanton Drew, Somerset6

7. Stonehenge, Wiltshire7

8. Bryn Celli Ddu. Anglesey8

9. Gamelands, Cumbria9

10. Pen Dinas, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion
10

Have you investigated the data yet? What sites have you found?

All images are © Environment Agency copyright and/or database right 2015. All rights reserved

Back in September the Environment Agency released a massive amount of open source LIDAR data for England and Wales. It is a bit patchy but we’ve been through it and found LIDAR for ten well known (and not so well known) prehistoric sites. Simply guess the sites!
Feel free to leave your guesses in the comments. There are no prizes available, just megarak pride.

1. 1

2.2

3. 3

4. 4

5. 5

6. 6

7. 7

8. 8

9. 9

10. 
10

All images are © Environment Agency copyright and/or database right 2015. All rights reserved

This year’s Summer Competition, courtesy of the PicToBrick  software which turns any photo into a Lego® mosaic, seems to have foxed many of you. I did say that it would be either remarkably easy, or incredibly difficult – it seems the latter was closer to the mark. One commentator on our Facebook page even failed to recognise three sites which we’ve visited together in the past!

As a reminder, we showed you 9 photos, each 48×32 Lego® studs in size, and asked you to name the monument. I think pretty much everyone got the first one correct due to its distinctive shape, but after that it got tricky, and no-one has yet come forward with a full set of answers. So without further ado, here are the answers in full:

1. Devil’s Den, Wiltshire

2 mosaic

2. Carreg Coetan Arthur, Pembrokeshire

1 mosaicOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

3. Kit’s Coty House, Kent

3 mosaic

4. Chun Quoit, Cornwall

Chun

5. Gwal-y-Filiast, St Lythans, South Glamorgan

5 mosaicOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

6. Whispering Knights, Oxfordshire

6 mosaicOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

7. Mulfra Quoit, Cornwall

7 mosaicMulfra

8. Pentre Ifan, Pembrokeshire

9 mosaicOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

9. Lanyon Quoit, Cornwall

8 mosaicLanyon

Don’t forget, if you’d like to try making any of these mosaics out of Lego® for yourself, we can provide full instructions on request, or you could download the software and make your own mosaic! But be warned: at around 6p for a single 1×1 brick, at 48×32 resolution each mosaic would cost around £100 to make, including the base plate!

I’ve heard it said that “once is an accident, twice is a habit, and a third time makes a tradition”. With that in mind, as we approach the end of Spring and another Bank Holiday weekend, it’s time for our now ‘traditional’ Summer Competition.

In the past we have featured stone circles and hillforts in our Summer competition. This year it’s the turn of Burial Chambers, Dolmens, Cromlechs, Quoits and the like from across England and Wales. Courtesy of the PicToBrick software, which turns any photo into a Lego® mosaic, we have 9 pictures for you to identify.

Each photo is 48×32 Lego® studs in size, and if anyone is mad enough to want a copy of the instructions for making their own mosaic from the bricks, we can provide. But be warned: at around 6p for a single 1×1 brick, each picture would cost around £100 to make, including a base plate!

Now this is either going to be remarkably easy, or incredibly difficult. A little hint; partially close/squint your eyes and defocus and the details should become clearer. We’ll start you off with an easy one…

1.

2 mosaic

2.

1 mosaic

3.

3 mosaic

4.

4 mosaic (2)

5.

5 mosaic

6.

6 mosaic

7.

7 mosaic

8.

9 mosaic

9.

8 mosaic

Once again, no other clues, no prizes, this is just a bit of Summer fun! How many can you get right? Answers to follow in a few days.

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