You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ category.

What looks like a superb exhibition of images of standing stones and stone circles opens on the 9th of March at the Heaton Cooper Gallery in Grasmere, Cumbria.

The exhibition features the work of Artist Tone Galuidi and photographer Gavin Parry.

A couple of sample images have been uploaded to Facebook, and if they are representative of the exhibition as a whole, then anyone in the Grasmere area is recommended not to miss this exhibition, as a treat is almost certainly in store!

The critics are unanimous: the British Museum’s new exhibition, The World of Stonehenge, is a triumph.

And so says the Guardian, who have given a glowing 5-star review to the latest extravaganza display of our Neolithic past within the museum’s hallowed halls.

Yet all is not necessarily well at the BM. Yet again, the sponsorship of the museum by petrochemical giants BP has been called into question.

And we would also question the use of the Stonehenge name in the exhibition. Individual exhibits range from across Europe and the UK – as shown by the use of the Nebra Sky Disk (made with Cornish Gold) on the cover of the accompanying catalogue (£35!) Is the Stonehenge name being used because of the money it can draw in? We all know that Stonehenge is a cash cow for English Heritage, Heritage England and the National Trust.

And finally, at the weekend our friends at the Stonehenge Alliance staged a small roadside protest outside the museum, to warn visitors that the Stonehenge World Heritage Site near Salisbury is still ‘under threat’ from a £1.7 billion major road scheme.

As regular readers will be aware, the plans to upgrade the A303 past the 5,000-year-old Stonehenge stone circle will cause “significant” harm to the World Heritage Site.

John Adams, chairman of the Stonehenge Alliance, said:

Stonehenge is one of the most impressive megalithic structures in the world and the World Heritage Site has the densest concentration of burial mounds anywhere in Britain.

The road scheme would require massive civil engineering works within the World Heritage Site, with huge damage to this unique landscape. Even the Transport Secretary accepted the road would cause significant harm.

The scheme was firmly rejected by five senior Planning Inspectors and by UNESCO and in 2021 the High Court quashed the development consent for the scheme. The Stonehenge Alliance is asking the Government to think again.

We need a new approach that improves people’s access to the South West without damaging the World Heritage Site or increasing carbon emissions. There are better schemes the government could spend £2bn on.”

We are reminded by one of our regular readers that there are just two weeks left in which to visit the Ways of Seeing Wiltshire exhibition at Wiltshire Museum in Devizes.

Echoing ideas of England’s heritage landscape pioneered across the 18th and 19th centuries, 20th century artists introduced new ways of appreciating chalk hill figures and prehistoric remains. This exhibition at Wiltshire Museum will highlight some of these works, held in the Museum’s own collection.

Between the First and Second World Wars, less travelled ways became routes to the past. The surrounding countryside developed creatively charged mysteries, evocatively punctuated by furrows, signposts and rolling cloud shadows. The absorbingly ambiguous was witnessed beyond hedgerows, railed fencing and wire strung between posts. Much was encountered and recorded as if noticed for the first time, if not at the point of being permanently lost from view.

Artists who would become household names were joined by educators, the tutored and the self-taught. The gateways to their timeless explorations, the customs and backwaters of sleepy villages and slower paced market towns. The diversity of architectural materials, shapes and styles, meeting with sequences of decline, weathering and repair, lent to the impression of all history being represented across the centuries.

Ways of Seeing Wiltshire offers opportunities to engage with these relatively recent times when, alongside the adoption of an ‘idealized’ English rural landscape, considering and interpreting the distant past and its unfamiliar cultures became increasingly significant. It was, after all, the evolving way in which the natural, built, and working heritage was being witnessed, reimagined and remembered, that shaped the ever extending present’s sense of attachment and belonging.

Middle Ridgeway by Eric Jones and Patrick Dillon accompanied by twenty superb paintings by Anna Dillon, published by Wessex Books, September 8, 2016: £16.95

middle-ridgeway

A sense of heightened anticipation can accompany the opening of any book for the first time, but all the more so when Anna Dillon’s magnificent cover illustration projects the reader into the very past and present rhythms of the Middle Ridgeway.  This book has then a great deal of promise to live up to. Suitably primed the reader will discover the content within is not unlike a magnificent pie: the subject is fondly handled, revered and obscure characters encountered, and a much loved natural world imported to one’s fireside. As they journey over an ‘ecological island’ from Avebury to White Horse Hill and onward to the Goring Gap, the authors carefully guide their readers back and forth across the vast expanse of time and cultural experiences, the unsurpassed illustrations of this chalk landscape by Anna Dillon regularly injecting a joyous spirit and a want to be there. Buy this book and you will never part with it no matter how many times you move or have a clear out, you will cherish it far too much to let it go.

poster

 An exhibition of Anna Dillon’s paintings accompany the launch of this book, they are on view at the White Horse Bookshop, Marlborough, until 30 September.

You can order the book direct here.

Some four years ago now, we asked “What next for London Stone?”  It appears that at long last that question will been answered, as from this Friday 13th London Stone will be on display in its new temporary home at the Museum of London whilst redevelopment of the site at 111 Cannon Street goes ahead.

london-stone1

The stone will be displayed in the Museum of London’s War, Plague & Fire gallery, and will remain at the museum while work is carried out to rebuild its previous home on Cannon Street.

The stone’s origins are bathed in myth, and it is said to hold the fate of London in its hands should it ever be removed or destroyed. Let’s wait and see…

Have you been keeping an eye on our Events Diary (see the link on the left)? You should. Here are a couple of things you could have missed this month if you haven’t ….

Tuesday, October 7   8:00pm

 Talk: Excavations in the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester and the origins of towns in Britain
When Tue, October 7, 8:00pm – 9:30pm
Where Letchworth Free Church, Gernon Road, Letchworth, Herts (map)
Description ‘Excavations in the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester and the origins of towns in Britain’, by Professor Michael Fulford, CBE, FBA, FSA, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. This will be a public lecture for which an admission charge will be made, with a reduced rate for NHAS members. http://www.nharchsoc.org/?p=467

PRESS RELEASE 8th July 2014

01209 831718 07789600941 @giantsquoit @sustrust
see The Sustainable Trust or Carwynnen Quoit on Facebook

Zactly's_better_than_not_quoit_small

IMAGE CREDIT: Jacky Nowakowski, Cornwall HES

The Sustainable Trust at Stithians Show
For anyone who missed our fabulous Solstice ‘Rock on at Carwynnen Quoit’, we are holding the last exhibition in this phase of the project next Monday.

To celebrate the Festival of Archaeology, the Council of Archaeology’s annual event, we will be showing new footage of the restoration along with a photographic exhibition of the project. Stithians Agricultural Association have kindly accepted us as one of their featured charities this year and we relish the opportunity to bring this project to a wider appreciative audience.

Visiting children will be able to make a pop up quoit card, a thaumotrope and a pocket book about the history of this 5000 year old monument, written in both Cornish and English. It will be a chance to talk about your memories of ‘The Frying Pan Field’ and the ‘Devil’s Quoit’ and hear about our re-creation of the famous 1925 picnic and future plans.

Pip Richards, director of sustrust said ‘We have been astounded at the amount of people who have shown appreciation for our work at Carwynnen. This field has now become a focal point for the community with its iconic megalithic structure. It feels symbolic that we have managed to restore one of the first man made landmarks during this time of recognition of Cornish identity. Thank you to everyone who has made this possible’.

 

Our monthly listing, compiled, as always, by Sue Brooke.

KENT:

Dover Museum and Bronze Age Boat Gallery

‘In September 1992, archaeologists from the Canterbury Archaeological Trust working alongside contractors on a new road link between Dover and Folkestone discovered the remains of a large wooden prehistoric boat thought to be some 3,000 years old, belonging to a period known to archaeologists as the Bronze Age. It was a find of both national and international significance which will shed new light on early seafaring and woodworking skills in Northern Europe. The boat is now displayed in a glass case as the centrepiece of a whole floor in the museum devoted to archaeology.’

Please note: the museum will be closed on Sunday’s from 1st. October 2013.

LONDON:

Royal Archaeological Institution:

The Royal Archaeological Institute (RAI) is a leading national archaeology society, with a history dating back to 1844. Its interests span all aspects of the archaeological, architectural and landscape history of the British Isles. Monthly Lectures take place from October to May and are held at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London. These are given by visiting speakers on recent research, current archaeological projects and new discoveries.

Date: 8 January 2014: the RAI debate – How and why did Britain become Neolithic?

Dr Alison Sheridan will debate with Professor Alasdair Whittle

Venue: Lectures are held in the rooms of the Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London at 5 p.m. preceded by tea at 4.30 p.m.

The Neolithic period marks a fundamental shift in lifestyles and settlement, one of the most important transformations to have occurred in the history of these islands. Hunting and gathering ceased to play a significant part in food procurement and farming was adopted, pottery was introduced and the stone tool kit changed. Were these novelties brought by incoming farmers from the Continent, where farming had been already been practised for many centuries, or did indigenous communities decide to take up a new way of life? These issues still engender heated debate amongst prehistorians; the three leading specialists of this period will air their views at the RAI!

Note: Members are welcome to bring a guest to lectures. Non-members are welcome to attend lectures but should contact the Administrator in advance.

British Museum

Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Gallery talk: Thursday 9 January 2014 at 13:15 to 14:00

Slowing down the damage: preventive conservation at the museum

Melanie Keable and Capucine Korenberg.

Gallery talk: Friday 10 January 2014 at 13:15 to 14:00

Iron Age religion – Jody Joy

Gallery talks are free – just drop in.

STONEHENGE:

Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site

Closed Christmas Eve and Christmas day

Opening times from 18 December 2013 to 15 March 2014

Monday to Sunday – open from 9:30 to 17:00

DEVIZES:

Wiltshire Museum

Gold from the time of Stonehenge – Telling Wiltshire’s Story

500,000 years of Wiltshire’s story told in a brand new £750,000 gallery featuring high quality graphics and leading-edge reconstructions.

On display for the first time are dozens of spectacular treasures dating to the time of Stonehenge and worn by people who worshiped inside the stone circle.

‘Britain’s greatest treasures from the mysterious golden Age of Stonehenge are to go on permanent display for the first time ever. This will be the largest collection of Early Bronze Age gold ever put on public display in England. In a move that will transform public understanding of the Stonehenge era, the Wiltshire Museum in Devizes, 15 miles north of Stonehenge, is exhibiting 500 Stonehenge period objects, including 30 pieces of gold treasure which have rarely been seen by the public before.

Amongst the ancient Stonehenge era treasures placed on permanent display for the first time, are a beautifully decorated gold lozenge, a magnificent bronze dagger with a gold- covered hilt, a golden fitting from a dagger sheath, a ceremonial axe, gold beads, necklaces, ear-rings, pendants and other items of gold jewellery, a unique jet disc (used to fasten a luxury garment), rare traces of ancient textiles and two of the finest prehistoric flint arrow head ever found’

Museum opening times:

Tuesday – Saturday -10am to 17:00, Sunday – 12 noon to 16:00.

Open throughout the year.

Closed: Mondays from January to March (except half term)

READING:

Berkshire Archaeological Society

Lecture: Romanised Egyptian Mummies by Professor Brian Sparkes

Date: 11 January 2014. 14:00 – 16:00

Location: Headley Road, Woodley

CARDIFF:

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff.

Date: 8 January 2014 – 13.05.

Archaeology Lunchtime Talk – ‘What lies beneath: The analysis of early Anglo-Saxon non-ferrous metalwork’ Matt Nicholas, PhD student, Cardiff University School of History, Archaeology & Religion.

Date: 22 January 2014 – 13.05.

Archaeology Lunchtime Talk – ‘Cardiff in the early post-medieval period: new finds from excavations at Mill Leat, Bute Park’

Date: 28 January 2014 – 13.05pm.

Behind the Scenes: Archaeology – Conservation Laboratory: Latest Work

These events are free but please book on your arrival. Some tours may be unsuitable for visitors with restricted mobility so please contact eventscardiff@museumwales.ac.uk for more detailed information.

If your local society or museum has an event that you’d like included in our listings, please contact us with the details, at least one calendar month in advance and we’d be pleased to include them. 

Last weekend saw the culmination of a successful community project in Cambridgeshire, led by the Meldreth Local History Group. The project was inspired by the Michael Woods TV programme “The Great British Story”, and two of the local historians, Kathryn Betts and Joan Gane led the project with the help of Dr Carenza Lewis,  gaining HLF funding of just over £7000 under the ‘All our Stories’  initiative.

The who!e community got involved, coming together for the digs over three weekends during the summer, and Meldreth Village Hall was packed to the rafters with local people looking to view the various finds from 32 test pits dug throughout the village, clustered around a two-mile stretch of road just west of the River Mel, a tributary of the River Cam.

When we arrived slightly early, we were greeted by Kathryn and her colleagues, and made to feel most welcome. A short film about the project, made as a digital record of the project was on continuous loop in a side room and we took the opportunity to watch this as background info, in relative peace before the main crowds arrived.

Just some of the finds on display.

Just some of the finds on display.

In the main hall, the finds from the 32 test pits were laid out on display, each pit showing a map and photographs, with the finds divided by context (depth). The vast majority of finds were of pottery sherds or animal bone, the outstanding find being a metallic ‘badge’, initially identified by the experts (including the PAS) as a Medieval Pilgrim Badge, which within the last week has now been correctly identified as a medieval mirror casing. In fact, this was possible due to an almost identical find from Billingsgate in London, dated to the late 14th century. This was so identical in fact, that it’s highly possible that the same mould was used to create the two items.

The 'Pilgrim Badge' from Meldreth Pit 7.

The ‘Pilgrim Badge’ from Meldreth Pit 7.

The Billingsgate Mirror Casing © Museum of London

The Billingsgate Mirror Casing © Museum of London

On cue, the hall was cleared and seating arranged in time for Carenza’s talk. She gave an overview of the test pitting procedure, and explained that everyone was given the opportunity to get involved, either by digging their own pit, helping dig someone else’s pit, sieving spoil, bagging finds, or just by keeping the diggers refreshed with food and drink!

Some of the pits and finds were then highlighted, and the correct identification of the mirror case was announced, showing that even the experts get it wrong sometimes!

Next some charts and maps were shown, putting the project’s finds into a regional context. The comparatively large amount of Bronze Age pottery was deemed unusual – it’s possible there were two or more small settlements or housing groups in the area. This starkly contrasts with the complete lack of Iron Age finds, although the amount of Roman material shows that the area was settled toward the end of the IA. There was then a gap, with no early Anglo Saxon finds until the 9th Century. Moving through the middle and later medieval periods, Meldreth was obviously an important and thriving centre, with many finds, some of which from the area of the manor indicate high status, and it seems the settlement was sustained (or at least not curtailed nearly as much as other nearby population centres) throughout the period of the Black Death.

Following on from the late medieval, the finds tailed off, with very little from the pre-Victorian and Victorian periods. It was interesting to see the pattern of finds through time, indicating the ebb and flow of the village’s fortunes.

Meldreth today is a commuter village, with a population close to two and a half thousand people, with many new houses, and a thriving community. The possibility exists, now that the History Group have the materials, for further test pitting to take place in the future, though this will depend to an extent upon further funding being made available. But for a small village just south of Cambridge, there is obviously more of the story to be told, and I suspect the community spirit and will is there to push the project forward even further.

Drinks and cakes were available for those who wished to stay behind and investigate the finds further, to chat with Carenza or to watch the films, but we made our way to the door, for the journey home to London.

 Many thanks to the project organisers for putting on such a great display, to all those who took part in the dig, and to everyone on the day who made us outsiders feel welcomed.

If you have a Community Archaeology project or event upcoming, please let us know about it in the comments, and if we can, we’ll try to come along and say hello!

Our monthly listing of events, lectures, and things to do and see, compiled as always by Sue Brooke.

KENT:

Dover Museum and Bronze Age Boat Gallery

‘In September 1992, archaeologists from the Canterbury Archaeological Trust working alongside contractors on a new road link between Dover and Folkestone discovered the remains of a large wooden prehistoric boat thought to be some 3,000 years old, belonging to a period known to archaeologists as the Bronze Age. It was a find of both national and international significance which will shed new light on early seafaring and woodworking skills in Northern Europe. The boat is now displayed in a glass case as the centrepiece of a whole floor in the museum devoted to archeology.’

A public lecture is being held as part of the ‘Beyond the Horizon’ exhibition in the museum. The lecture is free, open to all with no need to book.

LECTURE: Transmanche prehistory from the air – Paul Bennett

VENUE: 7pm in the Theatre, Dover Discovery Centre, Dover, Kent, CT16 1PB.

DATE: 12th December 2013

Please note: the museum will be closed on Sunday’s from 1st. October 2013.

DEVON:

Plymouth and District Archaeological Society

LECTURE: RECONSTRUCTING THE TIDES OF THE PAST: ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

Professor James Scourse

 DATE: 2nd December 2013

VENUE: Winter lectures are held on Monday evenings at 7:00 pm in the Devonport Lecture Theatre of the Portland Square Building, Plymouth University.

‘James Scourse is Professor of Marine Geology at Bangor University. His main research interests lie in the Quaternary and include hydrodynamic modelling of shelf seas and ocean-ice-climate interactions. The Irish Sea Ice-Sheet of the last glacial maximum and its contact with the Scillies is a particular interest. Professor Scourse will explain how paleotopographies can be derived from evidence of past sea-levels and models of glacial isostatic adjustment. He will present a model of changing tides over the past 21,000 years and will consider the implications for the foraging strategies and diet across the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition’

Non-members are welcome to attend all lectures but are asked to contribute £4 towards expenses. No need to book, just turn up.

CORNWALL:

Cornish Ancient Sites Protection Network

‘A charitable partnership formed to look after the ancient sites and monuments of Cornwall. Currently working closely with local communities and official organisations to protect and promote our ancient heritage landscape through research, education and outreach activities’.

Volunteers are always very welcome at the monthly clear-ups. These events are always a really good opportunity to get a bit more hands-on, whilst helping to clear an ancient site in the landscape. This not only allows for physical preservation of the site itself but helps it to be kept safe for others to enjoy in the future

DECEMBER CLEAN-UP:

DATE: Tuesday December 10th 11.00am

VENUE: Kynance Gate Settlement (SW 687 139). Meet at Kynance Cove car park (off A3083)

*Please note that suitable footwear and clothing is needed although tools or any necessary equipment will be provided*

Cornwal Archaeological Society

The Winter lecture season is now under way. Truro Lectures are held on Thursday evenings at 7.30pm Truro Baptist Church, Chapel Hill. Truro. TR1 3BD

DATE: 5 December 2013

LECTURE: The Corfield Nankivel Memorial Lecture: Professor Tim Darvill, OBE – “Stonehenge Rocks”

LONDON:

Royal Archaeological Institution

The Royal Archaeological Institute (RAI) is a leading national archaeology society, with a history dating back to 1844. Its interests span all aspects of the archaeological, architectural and landscape history of the British Isles. Monthly Lectures take place from October to May and are held at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London. These are given by visiting speakers on recent research, current archaeological projects and new discoveries.

DATE: 11th December 2013

LECTURE: Archaeology within the National Trust – Ian Barnes, Head of Archaeology, National Trust

VENUE: Lectures are held in the rooms of the Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London at 5 p.m. preceded by tea at 4.30 p.m.

‘The National Trust manages approximately 255,000 ha of land across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, over which 73,000 archaeological sites are recorded. As such, the Trust is one of the United Kingdom’s largest landowners and steward of some of the countries’ most significant archaeological monuments. The lecture will outline where archaeology sits as a discipline within the National Trust’s aims and objectives. The framework for managing the Trust’s archaeological monuments will be outlined, from a strategic policy perspective through to physical management. A brief overview of national projects will be given as well as a summary of the work of the internal Archaeological Consultants based around the Countries and Regions.

Note: Members are welcome to bring a guest to lectures. Non-members are welcome to attend lectures but should contact the Administrator in advance.

English Heritage

‘Step into Christmas Past’ – Events over Christmas:

‘Prepare to celebrate the season to be merry as you get hands on with crafts, listen to carollers carouse, get some dinner tips from a Victorian Cook or immerse yourself in a Blitz Christmas. Mix in the range of gifts available in our shops – why not buy someone special the Gift of Membership? – and you have the perfect recipe for a memorable Christmas’

For an event near you please check out the English Heritage web site

WILTSHIRE:

Wiltshire Museum

Revealing the Golden Treasures of the Age of Stonehenge

Opens: Sunday, 13th October, 2013

‘Britain’s greatest treasures from the mysterious golden Age of Stonehenge are to go on permanent display for the first time ever. This will be the largest collection of Early Bronze Age gold ever put on public display in England. In a move that will transform public understanding of the Stonehenge era, the Wiltshire Museum in Devizes, 15 miles north of Stonehenge, is exhibiting 500 Stonehenge period objects, including 30 pieces of gold treasure which have rarely been seen by the public before.

Amongst the ancient Stonehenge era treasures placed on permanent display for the first time, are a beautifully decorated gold lozenge, a magnificent bronze dagger with a gold- covered hilt, a golden fitting from a dagger sheath, a ceremonial axe, gold beads, necklaces, ear-rings, pendants and other items of gold jewellery, a unique jet disc (used to fasten a luxury garment), rare traces of ancient textiles and two of the finest prehistoric flint arrow head ever found’

Museum opening times:

Monday – Saturday -10am to 17:00

Sunday – 12 noon to 16:00

Open throughout the year.

Closed: Mondays from January to March (except half term) 

READING:

Berkshire Archaeological Society

LECTURE: Mesolithic Archaeology in the Severn Estuary – Professor Martin Bell

DATE: 14 December 2013, starting at 14:00

VENUE: Conference Hall, R.I.S.C, 35 – 39 London Street, Reading RG1 4PS

GLOUCESTER:

Gloucester and District Archaeological Research Group

LECTURE: The Long Dig: Monmouth – 1956 to date, telling the story of Monmouth, from the Ice Age to the late medieval principally via ‘amateur’ archaeology – Stephen Clarke

DATE: December 5th. 2013 at 19:30

VENUE: The Library of Ribston Hall High School, Stroud Road, Gloucester GL1 5LE

Non-members £3.00

WALES:

National Museum of Wales – Cardiff

Lecture: Archaeology Lunchtime Talk – ‘How do we understand Hillforts: Recent work at Ham Hill, Somerset and Caerau, Ely, Cardiff’ – Professor Niall Sharples, Cardiff University School of History, Archaeology and Religion

Date: 11th. December 2013 – 13:05

Venue: National Museum of Wales

‘Hillforts are one of the most common monuments to be found in Britain and they have been subjected to a considerable amount of archaeological research over the years. Despite this research there is still much to learn about these controversial monuments. The variety and longevity of the hillfort phenomena means that a single simple explanation for these monuments is problematic. This lecture will focus on two current excavations at Ham Hill in Somerset and Caerau in Cardiff. The excavations at Ham Hill occur in an area where many hillforts have been explored and on a hillfort which has been fairly intensively studied. Nevertheless it is still very difficult to explain why this is the largest hillfort in Britain and it is only our recent work that is beginning to understand how the hillfort developed. Caerau in contrast has never been explored before and is situated in a region, south Wales where practically no work has been done. Nevertheless, some of our discoveries can be compared to other hillforts and provide a context that helps to explain the development of the site’

Free entry – please book on arrival

If your local society or museum has an event that you’d like included in our listings, please contact us with the details, at least one calendar month in advance and we’d be pleased to include them. 

Archives

May 2022
S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Follow Us

Follow us on Twitter

Follow us on Facebook

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 10,386 other followers

%d bloggers like this: