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Of course there are ways to control fox numbers that don’t require men with an underdeveloped sense of rightness to go after them with dogs and guns. So why are you allowing it, Mr. Ewing? At a time when the need for human kindness is more obvious than ever, why is Scotland’s Government supporting needless human nastiness?

Surely you don’t think the “countryside campaigners” who applaud your “responsible attitude towards necessary predator control” are really countrywide campaigners or give a damn about anything except shooting animals for fun?

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Pound shop wolf hunters posing as “countryside campaigners”?

By Nigel Swift

Thankfully, knowledge theft through metal detecting has almost ended for now so we won’t now be highlighting it weekly. However, I’d like to point out that although our 1000+ articles on the subject have been largely ignored by British archaeological officials, they haven’t been abroad (as evidenced by hundreds of references on Academia.edu.)

We were particularly pleased this Wednesday that Happah, the French archaeologists’ conservation body, published a French translation of our 2014 chart, “An overseas PAS-enviers Guide: How to get the Public to Assume Avoidable Depletion with Inadequate Mitigation is Fine.”

We compiled it in 2014 in reaction to the words of the Director of the British Museum claiming the Portable Antiquities Scheme “is envied the world over“.  It’s simply not true, as French archaeologists understand.  Our original is here, followed by Happah’s French translation.

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More Heritage Journal views on artefact collecting
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Following our complaint yesterday about the stupidity and greed which has led the Detectival organisers to not cancel their event, three hours later they issued this statement:

“We have been waiting for the UK Government to release its latest advice [really? Why? Morons – Ed.], which they did Thursday afternoon. It is now clear that this outbreak isn’t going to last just a couple of weeks [that’s been known for months – Ed.] but is going to be an unprecedented long-haul challenge over the coming months.

As responsible event organisers and in line with our company values, the health and wellbeing of all those who attend our events is our priority [Oh really?! – Ed.].

If the UK Government does put restrictions in place for mass gatherings, we expect that any outdoor events under 500 people may continue to run, and as Spring Detectival falls into this category [only just – and maybe not if all the trades are counted – Ed.] we will continue with the event.”

Thus, they are still hanging on ruthlessly to the chance of making a profit and hiding behind future Government announcements rather than doing what is blatantly best for all attendees and their elderly relatives (and the poor, more intelligent PAS staff who certainly wouldn’t want to be there).

Let the Government and the public take note.

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More Heritage Journal views on artefact collecting
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We have been shocked to discover the National Council for Metal Detecting provides a set of 3 concocted excuses for people who dig up a hoard without waiting for an archaeologist. Apart from re-iterating that doing such a thing would definitely mean they forfeit a reward, the pending Treasure Act reforms ought to confront these excuses and demolish them:

  1. “you may be on a building site which is due to be bulldozed”. No, you won’t be. Builders almost never agree to that.
  2.  “the landowner may be insisting it is removed immediately.” No, he won’t. Why should he, unless you’ve lied to him about the correct procedure.
  3. “you may be on a rally with lots of prying eyes”. So what? Your duty, as a half-decent citizen who wants a reward, is to PROTECT the hoard until archaeologists can deal with it. (There are loads of ways as we’ve explained ad nauseam).

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Shouldn’t the central purpose of the Treasure Act reforms be to end these uniquely British outrages for which the NCMD is supplying ready-made excuses?

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More Heritage Journal views on artefact collecting
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The Trump administration is to open vast areas of the protected Grand Staircase-Escelante National Monument to mining and oil and gas exploration. Together with the removal of a million acres from Bears Ears National Monument this comprises the largest rollback of protection in US history.

So why is it “doing a Stonehenge”? Well, Governor Gary Herbert said “As I have reiterated for years, monuments should be as small as possible to protect artifacts and cultural resources” and County Commissioner Tammy Pearson said “The downsizing to a manageable acreage was the most amazing, selfless act of a sitting President of the United States. Utah thanks you President Trump.”

As small as possible …

Meanwhile at Stonehenge Historic England et al are campaigning to downsize the protected area surrounding Stonehenge by supporting the digging of a mile of new dual carriageway across it. Arguably, the largest rollback of protection in British history.

So it’s clear that Trump is doing a Stonehenge in Utah and, far more disgracefully, Historic England, English Heritage and the National Trust are doing a Trump in Wiltshire.

 

.((And why is it pink?!?)

More truth being tortured. See the Telegraph: “Now the Stonehenge tunnel has the green light, here are Britain’s worst traffic bottlenecks.” First, the tunnel doesn’t have the green light (unless friend-of-the-government Telegraph has been told otherwise.) Second, that headline implies Stonehenge is Britain’s worst bottleneck, which is a lie. There are hundreds of bottleneck areas and here are the worst ten:

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So the economic cost of congestion on the A303 near Stonehenge doesn’t register as high on the national scale, which begs the question did the tunnel have more to do with vote-catching than with rational economic necessity?

Perhaps the tunnel money could be spent in, for instance, Bristol or Leeds where the investment might be repaid in just a year rather than at Stonehenge where the National Audit Office and the Chancellor think it never will?

An extraordinary 86% of detectorists on the Minelab forum said they supported Brexit (far higher than any constituency in the country). The reason is clear. Apart from the unmentionable obvious, detectorists have long feared Europe would get Britain to regulate what they do. Not now though, exploitation is safe.

Plus, as a bonus, Europe’s environmental stewardship payments, much hated as restricting their activities, will now end, leaving tens of thousands of protected acres available for unregulated detecting once again. There’ll be dancing in the back room of the Pig and Whistle:

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But there’s a huge upside for those who see themselves as European:

In Europe The Assembly’s wish for further legislative control of detecting will no longer be obstructed by a single foolish country.

In Europe any further international conferences held by PAS praising themselves and laissez-faire detecting won’t be heeded.

The British inspired European Council for Metal Detecting will be dead in the water (for who in Europe will now listen to the Brits?)

No national museum within Europe will be telling landowners the wicked lie that metal detecting is  “citizen archaeology”. 

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More Heritage Journal views on artefact collecting
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