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After a pandemic-induced hiatus, the ever-popular Pathways to the Past event held by the Cornish Ancient Sites Protection Network (CASPN) returns next month.

CASPN Logo

The confirmed timetable for this year’s event is as follows:

Saturday May 28th:

  • 10.00-12.30pm A New Bosiliack Trail Guided Walk, visiting Bosiliack settlement, Lanyon & West Lanyon Quoits.
  • 2.00-5.00pm Where The Spirits Dwell, a guided walk visiting Zennor Quoit, Sperris Quoit and Sperris settlement. (small charge)
  • 7.30-9.00pm Investigating Archaeology & Astronomy at The Hurlers, an illustrated talk with archaeologist Jackie Nowakowski & Carolyn Kennett looking back at the excavations.

Sunday May 29th:

  • 11.00-12.30pm From Prehistory to Present – the remarkable story of ‘King Arthur’s Tombstone’. Archaeologist Ann Preston-Jones tells an intriguing story about the site at Slaughterbridge.
  • 2.00-5.00pm A Megalithic Meander in the Shadow of Carn Galva, a guided walk visiting barrows, a circle, an entrance grave and a menhir.
  • 7.30-9.00pm King Arthur in Cornish folklore. A talk by folklorist Steve Patterson, looking at how Arthur has appeared in myth, history, literature, mysticism and popular culture.

All events are free to CASPN members. All walks (for CASPN members only) have to be booked in advance, as places are limited (and going fast!) The three talks, which will be held at the Old Town Hall, St Just TR19 7HT are also open to the public @ £5 each. Full details, including how to become a member, can be found on the CASPN web site.

All things being equal and Covid mutations allowing, the Cornish Ancient Sites Protection Network (CASPN) will once again be holding their popular Pathways To The Past event over the late May Bank Holiday weekend (28-29 May 2022).

The event consists of a series of walks and talks over the two days. All events are free to CASPN members. The walks are restricted to members, and have to be booked in advance, but talks are open to non-members, for whom an entry charge of £5 is applicable.

We’ll be detailing the individual walks and talks planned for this year in a future post, so keep watching this space!

In addition to Pathways To The Past, CASPN hold regular monthly clean-up events at various sites, and are always looking for more volunteer Site Monitors to keep a regular eye on a selection of the many sites in the Penwith area.

Details of how to join CASPN and get involved in their activities throughout the year are available on their website.

Amesbury’s mid-winter lantern procession will take place on Monday 20th December 2021. As in previous years, the procession will start at 5.15pm in the central car park and make its way to find the Solstice lantern which will have been lit at Stonehenge and placed in the grounds of Amesbury Abbey near the spring. Along the route, and with thanks to the Cornelius Reid family, there will be mulled wine, mince pies, and sweets for those taking part.

Places will be limited, if you wish to join in, you MUST register first with your name, postcode, and contact details at Amesbury Filling station. If you require a lantern (no naked flames or searchlights allowed) there will be some for sale at the garage and in other stores where the poster is on display.

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Despite the pandemic this year, there has been a lot of activity in the archaeological world and now it’s time to decide who gets your vote in this year’s Current Archaeology Awards, which celebrate both the projects and publications that have made the pages of Current Archaeology magazine over the last 12 months, and the people judged to have made outstanding contributions to archaeology.

CA_awards-logo1

As always, there are four categories to vote in, and winners are decided purely on the number of public votes received. Click the following links to see the nominees in each category:

We’ve cast our vote, and now it’s time to cast yours, so peruse the nominees and make your choice.

Voting closes on 8 February 2021, and the winners will be announced at the special awards ceremony on 26 February at Current Archaeology Live! 2021. Although ongoing Covid restrictions mean that the conference will in all likelihood not be following the usual format this year, options are currently being explored by the conference team for this year’s event – for the latest details, see the conference web page.

The Current Archaeology Live conference took place over the weekend. Sadly I was unable to attend once again this year but true to form, the award winners were announced during the Friday evening reception.

The winners in the various categories were as follows:

Archaeologist of the Year (sponsored by Andante Travels): Alison Sheridan

Research Project of the Year (sponsored by Export & General Insurance Services Ltd): ‘Life beside the lake: opening a window on the Mesolithic at Star Carr‘, University of York/University of Newcastle/University of Chester.

Rescue Project of the Year (sponsored by Oxbow Books): ‘Roman Writing on the Wall: recording inscriptions at a Hadrian’s Wall quarry’, University of Newcastle/Historic England.

Book of the Year (sponsored by Butser Ancient Farm): ‘Life and death in the countryside of Roman Britain’, by A Smith, M Allen, T Brindle, M Fulford, L Lodwick, and A Rohnbogner.

The winner of the World Archaeology Photo Competition, sponsored by HiddenHistory and judged and presented by Adam Stanford of AerialCam, was Gavin McGuire.

Our hearty congratulations go out to all the winners with commiserations to all the nominees who came so close.

Putting all thoughts of the General election to one side for a moment (regardless of your politics), it’s time to decide who gets your vote in this year’s Current Archaeology Awards which celebrate both the projects and publications that have made the pages of Current Archaeology magazine over the 12 months, and the people judged to have made outstanding contributions to archaeology.

CA_awards-logo1

These awards are voted for entirely by the public – there are no panels of judges – so we encourage you to get involved and choose the project, publications, and people you would like to win.

As always, there are four categories to vote in, and winners are decided purely on the number of public votes received. Click the following links to see the nominees in each category:

We have checked all the nominees and have cast our votes. Now it’s your turn! Once you have made your choices, click here to cast your votes!

Voting closes on 10 February 2020, and the winners will be announced at the special awards ceremony on 28 February at Current Archaeology Live! 2020. Entry to the awards reception is included as part of the ticket for CA Live! – for more details, click here.

Once again, it’s time to decide who gets your vote in this year’s Current Archaeology Awards, which celebrate both the projects and publications that have made the pages of Current Archaeology magazine over the 12 months, and the people judged to have made outstanding contributions to archaeology.

CA_awards-logo1

As always, there are four categories to vote in, and winners are decided purely on the number of public votes received. Click the following links to see the nominees in each category:

We were pleased to see the Megalithic Portal‘s book, The Old Stones has been nominated for this year’s Book of the Year, and have cast our vote in that category accordingly.

Voting closes on 11 February 2019, and the winners will be announced at the special awards ceremony on 8 March at Current Archaeology Live! 2019. Entry to the awards reception is included as part of the ticket for CA Live! – for more details, see the conference web page.

As autumn draws to a close, and winter moves in, so the archaeological world moves indoors and the lecture and conference season begins.

One weekend at the start of next month looks to be quite busy and a popular date for one-day conferences.

Saturday November 10th sees several lecture events around the country.

Firstly, at St Fagan’s National Museum of History near Cardiff, there is an event; Archaeology in the Severn Estuary. Tickets and Agenda are available on the Eventbrite website.

Meanwhile, in Truro, The Cornwall Archaeology Society is holding a symposium on the same day; Archaeology in Cornwall. Tickets and programme available from the society web site

Across country in Surrey, the CBA South East are holding their AGM and Conference in Chertsey, with a range of talks themed around Structured Deposits.

Much further north in Stirling is Scotland’s Community Heritage Conference, again bookable via EventBrite.

Meanwhile, in Norwich the Prehistoric Society is co-hosting a lecture with the Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society; Living with Monuments: settlement, monumentality, and landscape in the Neolithic.

And finally, in Devizes the Wiltshire Museum are presenting a lecture; the Scandinavian Flint Axe Type in Britain by Dr. Katharine Walker, discussing the connections between Scandinavia and the British Isles in the Neolithic period.

I’ll be at the Truro event, which one are you going to?

As the archaeological digging season comes to a close, so the lecture season begins. We’ve received notice of an upcoming series of talks which will be of interest to those in the NE of England.

Robin Daniels of Tees Archaeology will be doing a short series of three talks on the Archaeology of the Area at Preston Park Museum, Stockton on Tees. Each talk will look in detail at one of the major excavated sites in the area and set it within its period.

The series of talks is headed ‘Meet the Neighbours’, and will cover three separate time periods: The Iron Age, The Romans, and the Saxons:

  • Tuesday 18 September 2018 – Noisy Neighbours (Horses, Dogs and Blacksmiths): The Iron Age settlement at Thorpe Thewles (Tomorrow! Free!)
  • Tuesday 16 October 2018 – Posh Neighbours (Central Heating, Baths and Wine): The Roman Villa at Ingleby Barwick
  • Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Quiet Neighbours (Bones, Bracelets and Burial Goods): The Saxon Cemetery at Norton

All talks take place from 10.00-11.00am in the Music Room. Please book in person or by ringing 01642 527375. £2.00, including refreshments (no charge for September talk).

Via Twitter, our attention was recently drawn to a project that looks to be of interest, primarily to those in the north of the UK, but also to anyone with an interest in the cultural overlap between Britain and Scandinavia.

The NATUR: North Atlantic Tales project is:

looking for people, projects and institutions who would be interested in working with an artist from overseas and who have stories to tell that connect Northern English and Scottish cultural heritage with any of Iceland/Norway/Denmark (and vice versa) including:

  • Professional museums and archives
  • Personal collections and archives
  • Music, moving image and photography collections (both catalogued and hoarded)
  • Societies, groups and communities that can trace those connections
  • Researchers working across our partnering countries
  • Academics and academic departments connecting our partnering countries
  • Personal Testimony

It seems to us to be a worthwhile project, and the highlighted item above could well be a chance for our metal detecting friends (responsible or otherwise) to share some of the knowledge of what they’ve found or otherwise obtained. From our own perspective, we’re thinking primarily of ‘Viking’ related materials but the project’s scope seems to far beyond just the physical artefact connections:

The first NATUR project will broadly interrogate 7 themes through the archives of each country that shaped and continue to forge a shared Northern identity – folklore and language, merchants, fisheries, industrialisation, conflict, oil, and women’s history.

Cuerdale hoard viking silver british museum

So if you have any collections or other input which may fit the scope of the project, why not contact them through their website and offer to share your knowledge?

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