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The Council for British Archaeology’s Local Heritage Engagement Network are holding an event in London on 20th June, entitled ‘Activism, Advocacy and Supporting your Heritage’. The event is designed to help attendees gain skills and confidence to begin to engage in local advocacy and activism to support their local historic environment, or to increase the impact of their present advocacy work.

Speakers will provide up to date background information to threats facing local authority archaeology and heritage services. They will discuss what can be done to protect and advocate for these services, as well as present examples of best practice from community groups currently engaged in campaigns. The programme also includes workshops which will allow for discussion of attendee’s present work and how it could be adapted or used for advocacy impact and will provide information on how to get in the media, and get your message across to members of the public and decision makers.

Anyone is welcome to attend this event – you do not need any previous experience of heritage advocacy. There is a small cost to attendees (£5), to cover refreshments during the break and speakers travel expenses.

Bookings can be made via the Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/local-heritage-network-training-activism-advocacy-and-supporting-your-heritage-tickets-16747136135 web site, but be quick! Tickets are going fast!

Once again, CASPN‘s  ‘Pathways to the Past’ event, a weekend of daytime walks & evening talks among the ancient sites of West Penwith is rapidly approaching. 2015 is the ninth year of this event, which has only gone from strength to strength. I’ve been fortunate enough to attend several of the previous year’s walks, but sadly my holiday dates don’t coincide this year – poor planning on my part!

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There is a good mix of items this year, so to help you plan your time, here’s the full line-up for the weekend of May 30th/31st 2015:

Saturday May 30th

10.00-12.30pm Catching the light of the sun and moon

A guided circular walk with Cheryl Straffon & Lana Jarvis to visit prehistoric sites that were aligned to the sun and moon, including the Mên-an-Tol, the Nine Maidens barrow & stone circle and Bosiliack barrow.

Meet at Mên-an-Tol layby beside Madron to Morvah road [SW418 344]

2.00-4.30pm Living at the Edge

A guided walk with archaeologist David Giddings to visit the lesser-known Nanjulian courtyard house settlement, perched at the edge of the land between St. Just and Sennen.

Meet at Nanjulian off the B3306 St.Just to Sennen road [SW360 294] TR19 7NU

8.00-10.00pm Hot Metal: the discoveries that changed the world

An illustrated talk by Paul Bonnington about the invention of metal making and the effect this had on the Bronze, Copper and Iron Age societies.

At the Count House at Botallack. TR19 7QQ

Sunday May 31st

11.00-12.30pm Sites on the Scillies

An illustrated talk by archaeologist Charlie Johns, exploring some of the unique and beautiful ancient sites on the Isles of Scilly and the prehistoric people who built them.

At the Count House at Botallack

2.00-4.30pm Stories in the Stones – the Merry Maidens and more

A guided walk with archaeologist Adrian Rodda to sites in the Lamorna area, including the Merry Maidens stone circle, associated standing stones and Tregiffian entrance grave.

Meet at Boleigh farm on the B3315 Penzance to Lamorna road. [SW436 349] TR19 6BN

8.00-9.00pm Community Archaeology

To round off the weekend, Richard Mikulski will chat about community archaeology projects. At the North Inn, Pendeen.

Each individual event is £5 but free to members of FOCAS (Friends of Cornwall’s Ancient Sites). You can join FOCAS (Friends of Cornwall’s Ancient Sites) at the beginning of the individual event, by telephoning 07927 671612, or by e-mailing: focus@cornishancientsites.com

Once again, the annual two-day archaeology-fest that is the CA Live! Conference organised by Current Archaeology magazine and sponsored by the Institute of Classical Studies is rapidly approaching. Held on February 27th and 28th in the stately setting of University of London’s Senate House, this year’s timetable looks as exciting as ever, and as in recent years, the Heritage Journal will be there again to live Tweet the proceedings.

CALive

This year’s conference kicks off with a session looking at Anglo-Saxon Settlements, with contributions from Neil Faulkner, Andrew Reynolds and Helena Hamerow.

The World Archaeology session, sponsored by sister magazine Current World Archaeology, features Brian Fagan talking on ‘Tutankhamun and Lord Carnarvon’, Richard Hodges on ‘Rome’s Great Treasures’ and Ian Hodder with ‘Neolithic Çatalhöyük‘.

There is then a session Rescuing the Past, with Neil Holbrook, Ann Crone and Roger Bland, before the keynote speaker, Martin Biddle. This is followed by the now traditional drinks reception and Current Archaeology Awards ceremony. All winners will be decided by a readers’ vote – nominations for the four categories can be viewed on the Current Archaeology web site and you can cast your vote in each category there too.

The conference continues on the Saturday with our favourite session In Search of the Prehistoric, chaired by Julian Richards. Talks include Chris Stringer describing the work at Happisburgh, David Jaques on Blick Mead, and Jim Leary – ‘Silbury Hill and massive monuments’

A session on Boats in Archaeology then follows, with Karl Brady on ‘The Lough Corrib logboats’, Robert Van de Noort ‘Building Morgawr’ and Mark Jones ‘Conserving the Mary Rose’ taking us to the lunch break.

Finally, a session on Roman Frontier Life follows, chaired by David Breeze. Lidsay Allason-Jones tells us about Housesteads and Matthew Symonds explains the Passage aAcross the Frontier.  Finally the conference concludes with a talk on ‘The Imperial War Museum and WW1′ by Paul Cornish.

There are some pretty enticing topics, and as usual, something for everyone no matter which particular period of the past piques your interest! And don’t forget the marketplace, with stalls selling publications, courses, tours and other items of interest

Tickets are going fast, so don’t forget to reserve yours as soon as possible! If you’re there, why not come up and say Hello!

It’s that time of year again. With just 3 months to go before the Current Archaeology Live! conference in London, the nominations for the Current Archaeology Awards have been released.

CALive

The awards are designed to celebrate some of the stories and people featured in the magazine throughout the course of the year. There is no panel of judges, the only votes that count are those from the readership in the public vote via the website, so it really is just down to you (collectively) as to who the winners are.

As in previous years, there are four main categories to vote for:

  • Research Project of the Year
  • Archaeologist of the Year
  • Rescue Dig of the Year
  • Book of the Year

The nominees in each category are as follows:

Research Project of the Year

  • How to build a dolmen: exploring Neolithic construction at Garn Turne
  • Maryport’s mystery monuments: investigating gigantic timber structure from the imperial twilight
  • Rethinking the Staffordshire Hoard
  • Exploring Anglo-Saxon settlement: the origins of the English village
  • The logboats in the lake: Bronze Age wrecks and Viking-style battle axes from Lough Corrib, Ireland

Archaeologist of the Year

  • Michael Fulford
  • Neil Holbrook
  • Simon Thurley

Rescue Dig of the Year

  • First impressions: discovering the earliest footprints in Europe (the Happisburgh Project)
  • Neolithic houses: exploring a prehistoric landscape at Kingsmead Quarry
  • The many faces of Silbury Hill: unravelling the evolution of Europe’s largest prehistoric mound
  • The sacking of Auldhame: investigating a Viking burial in a monastic graveyard
  • Buried Vikings: excavating Cumwhitton’s cemetery
  • Bodyguards, corpses, and cults: everyday life in the Roman military community at Inveresk

Book of the Year

  • Time’s Anvil: England, archaeology, and the imagination (Richard Morris)
  • Religion in Medieval London: archaeology and belief (Bruno Barber, Christopher Thomas and Bruce Watson)
  • The Secret History of the Roman Roads of Britain (Michael Bishop)
  • The Great Archaeologists (Brian Fagan)
  • The History of Archaeology (Paul Bahn)
  • Home: a time traveller’s tales from Britain’s prehistory (Francis Pryor)

I’ve already made my choices and voted. Now it’s your turn. Just visit the website or pick up issue 298 of the Current Archaeology magazine (available from 5th December) to read more about each of the nominees, and place your votes for each category.

We’ve just received the following Press release from our friends at the Sustainable Trust, announcing the official end of the Carwynnen Quoit project.

‘The Restoration of Carwynnen Quoit’ commemorative book to be launched. 

The Sustainable Trust’s award winning community project will be completed soon. A non-academic record of the project is being published and will be available from Troon Church Hall, Treslothan Road on Saturday December 6th between 6 & 8pm.

All aspects of the project are described from excavations and finds to the ‘Ballad of Carwynnen’, poems, oral and local history.

Short films about the Quoit will be shown, refreshments will be available and there will be an opportunity to buy a print of the 2014 recreation of the 1925 Old Cornwall Society’s picnic.

Pip Richards from the Sustainable Trust said “We have chosen to hold this event at the nearest community building to the quoit, hoping that some of the more elderly residents of Troon may be encouraged to attend. We are grateful to them for sharing their memories with us and look forward to a future project in the area.”

The suggested donation of £6 for the book will help cover printing costs and fund Sustrust’s next project.

email pip.sustrust@gmail.com to reserve a copy.

Recently the restoration was awarded the Council for British Archaeology’s Marsh Award for community archaeology, a national award. The project manager, was also the first lady recipient of the Sir Richard Trant Heritage Champion award from the Cornwall Heritage Trust.

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Just think, if you haven’t been keeping an eye on our Events Diary you could have missed this! It’s a special early evening bookable tour (for over 12’s) being run by English Heritage next Saturday (to include a visit to the stones), all about the stars and planetary movements and how early man may have utilised them.

[Please bookmark our Events Diary if you haven’t done so already.]

 

 

 

Have you been keeping an eye on our Events Diary (see the link on the left)? You should. Here are a couple of things you could have missed this month if you haven’t ….

Tuesday, October 7   8:00pm

 Talk: Excavations in the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester and the origins of towns in Britain
When Tue, October 7, 8:00pm – 9:30pm
Where Letchworth Free Church, Gernon Road, Letchworth, Herts (map)
Description ‘Excavations in the Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester and the origins of towns in Britain’, by Professor Michael Fulford, CBE, FBA, FSA, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. This will be a public lecture for which an admission charge will be made, with a reduced rate for NHAS members. http://www.nharchsoc.org/?p=467

Volunteers are being sought to help complete the building of a stone circle at Brockholes Nature Reserve, East Lancashire.

Five large stones have already been moved to a view point overlooking the reserve, Two of them were moved up the hill by a dozen volunteers who also dug holes and secured them in place. Also, “The Pendle Stone” has been transported from Nick of Pendle by the County Council (can anyone supply further information on this?)

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Brockholes.

Lancashire Wildlife Trust’s Alan Wright said: “While we are organising the main events on specific days in the calendar, it would be good to get voluntary groups involved. It is hard work but the more people we get involved the easier it is. It is also a great sense of achievement when you get the stones upright and in the ground.”

Senior Conservation Officer John Lamb said: “We are looking to have 13 stones in place by the winter solstice on December 21. We will be moving more stones on November 2 and December 21, but we really need groups of volunteers to help us on other days.”

Anyone willing to help can contact John at 01772 324129.

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[ Image and story from Lancashire Telegraph ]

Cheer up, Spring is here!

Here’s how they celebrated Spring Equinox at “The Henge”, Australia, “a Stone Circle formed as an artistic circle for the enjoyment of its admirers and passers by. Built by Robbie & Tracey Wallace”

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SPRING EQUINOX

It’s a weekend of Megameets!

Firstly on Saturday, there is an informal meet in the depths of Cornwall, at the stone circle in Duloe, south of Liskeard as part of the Mines and Megaliths walk. Combine a love of all things prehistoric with chat about the industrial archaeology of Cornwall – famed for it’s mining.

Mines and Megaliths. A walk in the shadow of Caradon Hill on the edge of Bodmin Moor. Footpaths and quiet country lanes lead to some well known sites, but also some hidden industrial remains that make up part of Cornwall’s World Heritage sites. Meet Outside the Crows Nest Inn (Please don’t use their carpark). 10am 574 Western Greyhound from Liskeard at 9.56am; 573 service from Looe at 9.02am connects with this. Walk will last approx 3 hours.

Duloe Circle. © AlanS

Duloe Circle. © AlanS

Then on Sunday, it’s a final call for those intending to come along to the Rollright Stones for our annual ‘Megameet’. Meet at 12:00 midday, just south of the circle (or the Red Lion at Long Compton if inclement). Bring a book (or several) to swap, have  a chat with lots of lovely like minded people and enjoy the King Stone, the King’s Men and the Whispering Knights. Oh, and don’t forget a snack to eat or share! See you there!

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 UPDATE: We’ve been asked by the Rollright Trust to remind people that if events are planned at the stones they would appreciate being told in advance.

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